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Parenting Guide For Parents of Teen Drivers

Learning what to do in driving situations

The moment that your teen driver receives his or learner's permit is a moment that you won't soon forget. As much as you love your child, you also can't help worrying about what might happen when your teenager hits the open road. While you'll typically take the time to show your teen the basics of driving, work with your younger driver on different types of roads and ensure that your teenager reads all the testing materials carefully, you also want to take the time to sit down and discuss the potential hazards with your new driver.

Drinking and Driving

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 22 percent of all teenagers over the age of 15 were part of an accident involving drinking and driving. As a parent, you need to make your children understand the dangers of driving while under the influence of alcohol or any type of drug. Drugs and alcohol lower your reaction time, impair your decision making skills, and give you a fuzzy or cloudy mind. Free DMV Practice Tests has an abundance of information that you can share with your teen, including the drinking and driving laws in different states and which states have zero tolerance laws in place.

Distracted Driving

Distracted driving is just as potentially dangerous as driving while intoxicated. Most people think of distracted driving as driving while texting or talking on a cell phone, but it can also include talking to friends, putting on makeup, or even playing with a tablet or music player while driving. It only takes a second for an accident to happen, and that second can come when your teen takes their eyes off the road to change a song or talk to a friend.

After an Accident

As a parent, the most important step you can take involves teaching your child what to do after an accident. Teens should always carry proof of car insurance, a cellphone, and an emergency kit with flares and other signaling devices. Teaching your teen which steps to take after an accident or emergency situation can help you breathe a little easier. "