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Drivers Education

What To Expect in Drivers Education

Driver's education courses make it easier for a young driver to get an unconditional license or save money on auto insurance. In many states, passing such a course is required for a driver under 18 to obtain a license at all. If you enroll in driver's education courses, what can you expect from them?

Driver's education courses make it easier for a young driver to get an unconditional license or save money on auto insurance. In many states, passing such a course is required for a driver under 18 to obtain a license at all. If you enroll in driver's education courses, what can you expect from them?

Learn About Good Driving

In driver's education, you will be taught the best practices for how to be a safe and courteous driver on the road. Your instructors will spend time in a classroom and possibly a driving simulator teaching you the basics of how to drive. In the classroom, you will learn the theory behind defensive driving, who has right of way in a given situation and the meanings of various road signs.

Learn How to Drive Safely on the Road

After you have spent time in the classroom, you will spend time driving an actual vehicle. This gives you quality time on the road to learn about and react to different driving situations as they come up. In most cases, you will be driving a vehicle with an automatic transmission to make it easier on you.

Prepare for Your Road Test

Your driver's education program may devote time to helping you pass your official road test. At the conclusion of your driver's education course, you will have valuable insight as to your strengths and weaknesses behind the wheel. Along with a DMV practice test to help you pass your written test for a license, this information can help you improve and refine your skills before taking your actual road test. Driver's education courses can help you learn a lot about being safe on the road. As a new driver, it is important that you understand the rules of the road and can abide by them. Whether you have your license or are still striving for it, it is never a bad idea to brush up on your skills or break bad habits while you are still young.

10 Tips to Pass Your DMV Written Test

Pass your DMV Test with out fear.
According to a study done by an insurance company in 2010, it was estimated that 1 in 5 drivers currently on the road could not pass a written driving test. With numbers like this for drivers who have already passed their written tests, yet aren't competent enough to pass it again, passing for the first time may feel a bit ominous. It should. 70 percent of first-time test takers go home with a failing grade.

According to a study done by an insurance company in 2010, it was estimated that 1 in 5 drivers currently on the road could not pass a written driving test. With numbers like this for drivers who have already passed their written tests, yet aren't competent enough to pass it again, passing for the first time may feel a bit ominous. It should. 70 percent of first-time test takers go home with a failing grade.

If this statistic alone makes you want to throw up your number 2 pencil and note cards in defeat, don't fret. Help is here.

If you don't pass the first time you can take it again, but my Mother always said when you do something, do it right the first time. Moms are always right, I think, and this time is no different. Plus, passing the first time will save you money, time, and the stress of having to study again. Here are some tips to pass the test the first time and show Mom that for once in your life you listened to her.

1. Pick up a handbook from your local DMV, or download online so you can familiarize yourself with your state's laws.

Simply picking it up and using as a coaster on your coffee table won't suffice. There are plenty of people who go to the gym, but that doesn't mean they have Pecs that woman drool over. It just means they spend most of their time wasting it. Open the booklet and browse through casually. It can be quite long, so don't stress yourself out to read it word for word. Reading without stress the first time will give you a foundation before you fine tune your studying later. Jot down some notes on note cards, make a study document on your computer, or highlight some points that catch your eye.

2. Go online and find yourself a practice test to gauge where you are at.

Make sure you choose the right state because each state's laws may vary. If you're not sure what state you are in, then perhaps this test may be the least of your worries.

3. Re-Read.

After you complete your practice test, go back to your handbook and read through like it is the last Harry Potter novel and you don't want to miss anything. Since you've taken the practice test, now you'll know a little bit more of what to look for and what to notate. Or, if you are like most of the population and prefer the cliff notes, then you can choose your own adventure and skip to tip four.

4. Find yourself a study guide.

Freedmvpracticetests.com offers a great DMV Cheat sheet that will not only save you hours of time, but includes sample questions, requirements for obtaining your license, and other helpful tips.

5. Study, Study, Study.

No athlete has ever been interviewed after a loss and said they didn't execute because they over prepared. Taking a test works the same way. The more you can retain the better. Focus on specific numbers such as maximum speed limits in different areas; residential, schools, etc.

6. Re-take the practice tests.

Your computer won't shut off after due to exhaustion after too many practice tests like us humans will. Take as many practice tests as you can. The more practice, the more perfect as they say. Get used to the wording the tests use so you aren't stumped during the test. When you're burnt out, take a break, then come back to it.

7. Get plenty of sleep the night before the test, and eat a hearty breakfast.

Here we go with preaching from Mom again. She's right. Again.

8. During the test, make sure you fully read each question thoroughly.

The last thing you'd want to do after all the time you've spent is to miss a question because you were too fast to answer or misread it. The test can be tricky and for that reason alone, you want to look out for all wording such as legal or illegal, right turn or left turn, crosswalk or sidewalk, etc. Don't assume you know the answer until you've read the entire question.

9. When you come to an question you don't know, relax and pick the best answer.

Isn't this obvious? No. Test nerves will make you question whether or not you are even wearing pants or not. Take a deep breath. This isn't a write-in ballot. If you've studied the cheat sheets, chances are you'll be able to narrow the answer to at least the best two. Pick the one that makes the most common sense.

10. Be positive.

You studiedYou finished your grapefruit parfait at breakfast. You should be good to go. Keep a positive outlook and you will receive a positive score.

 

What tips do you have for other drivers? Leave your best tips in the comments below.

 

Drivers Ed, or No Drivers Ed?

For many teenagers, Drivers Education is the gateway to getting a drivers permit. It also allows them to learn the rules of the road from professional teachers, and from instructors who can teach to the drivers test. But, how necessary is Drivers Ed for a teenager to earn his or her license? It costs money for driving instruction. So, is it worth it?

For many teenagers, Drivers Education is the gateway to getting a drivers permit. It also allows them to learn the rules of the road from professional teachers, and from instructors who can teach to the drivers test. But, how necessary is Drivers Ed for a teenager to earn his or her license? It costs money for driving instruction. So, is it worth it?
 
Drivers Ed often involves a combination of classroom, in-car, and online training regarding road conditions, hazardous weather, and proper driving strategies. Drivers Ed can be found at a variety of locations: online, specific driving schools; some high schools even offer certified driving instruction opportunities. Even through Drivers Ed is open to all ages, it is necessary for teenagers to go through the training in order to get their license at an earlier age. However, if your teen waits until the age of 18, he or she doesn't have to go through Drivers Ed, but merely has to pass both the driving and the written exam at the DMV.
 
If you choose to have your teen wait until the age of 18, then the driving instruction is going to have to come from somewhere. Your teen certainly doesn't want to take the drivers test without any time behind the wheel! Parents can opt to instruct their kids themselves, or to hire a private instructor. A private instructor is much more expensive, but a private instructor can also teach to the drivers test, and perhaps cover traffic rules and bad habits that parents may unintentionally showcase. However, parents can also take the time to coach on car maintenance and can do the instruction on those short trips to the grocery store or to the mall.
 
Yet, most teenagers won't want to wait until they are 18 in order to drive. They'll want to get into the driver's seat sooner than that, even if it's for the privilege of driving their friends around or not needing a ride from Mom or Dad. In most cases, the only way to get around that is to enroll them in Drivers Ed, since that's the only way for them to get their license before they turn 18. So, Drivers Ed is completely worth if from the teenager's perspective, and it might save parents from having to sit in the front seat as their teen learns to drive.
 
Drivers Ed may be a tough call for parents if money is tight, but fortunately there are plenty of online options that can help your teen practice for the test or to take online Drivers Ed. Online is also a good option if there isn't Drivers Ed or a driving instructor close by. Overall, Drivers Ed has to come from somewhere, and it's best to get some instruction before obtaining the license. You want your teen driving on the road with the most experience possible.

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