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Teen

How Parents Influence Their Teen's Driving

Even though it may seem that your teenager is trying hard to be as unlike you as possible you have more influence than you might imagine. If you have bad driving habits	your teen is very likely to develop many of the same habits. Think about the following tips so that you can be a good driving role model.
Even though it may seem that your teenager is trying hard to be as unlike you as possible you have more influence than you might imagine. If you have bad driving habits your teen is very likely to develop many of the same habits. Think about the following tips so that you can be a good driving role model.

Even though it may seem that your teenager is trying hard to be as unlike you as possible you have more influence than you might imagine. If you have bad driving habits your teen is very likely to develop many of the same habits. Think about the following tips so that you can be a good driving role model.

Familiarize Yourself with State Laws

To teach safe driving you need to be a safe driver. The first step is to know as much as you can about local driving regulations. Consider taking a DMV Practice Test for your state or look at a DMV Cheat Sheet to refresh your knowledge. Knowing the rules helps you drive more safely while being better equipped to teach your new driver.

Do Not Drive Distractedly or Aggressively

If you make phone calls text constantly change radio stations eat or do anything else that takes your attention away from the road your young drivers are more likely to assume that these are acceptable behaviors. The same goes for aggressive driving. If you drive recklessly tailgate others or drink and drive you will be setting a bad example. Keep your focus on driving responsibly and your teenagers will learn to do the same.

Practice Good Driving Habits

Set up a routine for when you get behind the wheel. When you get in the car check the mirrors fasten seat-belts and keep your hands at the proper position while you drive. It will soon become second nature for both you and your teens.

Build Good Maintenance Habits

Many young drivers are ill-equipped to take care of their vehicles. It can lead to costly repairs and even accidents. Teach your young ones about common warning signs such as brake noise or a rattle in the steering wheel. Make sure they can check fluid levels tire pressure and wiper blades. Here is a great article about some of the basic maintenance practices all teens should know. Use this advice to help teach your teens and improve your own driving. The apple never falls far from the tree ̢��‰�� if you are a good driver you will raise good drivers!

Teen Drinking and Driving

If you are the parent or guardian of a teen who will soon be testing to receive his or her driver's license, then you may be understandably nervous. After all, you care greatly about your child's safety and worry about him or her being behind the wheel. Still, it is a teen's rite of passage to obtain a driver's license, which means all you can do is prepare him or her to be as safe as possible on the road.

If you are the parent or guardian of a teen who will soon be testing to receive his or her driver's license, then you may be understandably nervous. After all, you care greatly about your child's safety and worry about him or her being behind the wheel. Still, it is a teen's rite of passage to obtain a driver's license, which means all you can do is prepare him or her to be as safe as possible on the road. One hazard that many parents may not consider when they speak to their teens about the inherent responsibilities that come along with having a driver's license is avoiding drugs and alcohol. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, teen drinking and driving is a surprisingly common cause of teenage vehicle collisions, responsible for more than 20 percent of fatal car crashes involving drivers under 21 years old. Getting into an accident because of drinking and driving can not only cause serious injury or even death but could also result in your teen being stuck with a DUI on his or her record, which could affect future employment and education. Because of this, it is important for parents to speak with their teens about the importance of resisting peer pressure to try drugs and alcohol. This is especially true of teens who have their driver's licenses and could be putting themselves and others at severe risk by drinking and driving. It is also important for parents to note that laws and penalties regarding teens drinking and driving can vary greatly from state to state, which is why it is recommended that all parents find out more about state-specific teen drinking and driving laws that may apply to their children. Free DMV Practice Tests offers a number of helpful resources for prospective drivers, including a useful DMV practice test to help teens review traffic regulations. Be sure to check it out for yourself and share this information with your teen to help him or her stay safe and responsible behind the wheel.

Tips For Parents Of Teen Drivers

Have teens pay for their insurance
As a parent of a teenager who is learning to drive or already has their license, you have a lot to think about. Although you want your kids to be independent, you also know that he or she still need rules and guidelines to ensure safety on the road. What can parents of teen drivers do to help their children stay safe?

As a parent of a teenager who is learning to drive or already has their license, you have a lot to think about. Although you want your kids to be independent, you also know that he or she still need rules and guidelines to ensure safety on the road. What can parents of teen drivers do to help their children stay safe?

Set Ground Rules Right Away

State law already dictates when teens can drive and who can be in the car with them as well as that they must be completely sober when behind the wheel. However, you may wish to add additional rules when your teenager gets his or her license. If you do impose extra rules, make sure that they are made clear before and after your teen starts driving. You may also want to ask you teen driver to take a DMV practice test to make sure they know the rules of the road before starting to drive.

Make Sure That Your Child Has a Hands-Free Kit and a GPS

Teenagers love to be on their cell phones. Unfortunately, cell phones and driving do not mix. If your teen must use a phone while in the car, you should make cell phone use safer by installing a hands-free kit in the car. Additionally, having a GPS in the car ensures that your teen driver will never get lost while on the road.

Ask Your Child to Pay for Gas and Insurance

Your teen driver may not be able to make a car payment on his or her own yet. However, if your teen uses the car, he or she should help pay for it. At the very least, you should demand that the gas tank stays full and any additional insurance costs are paid for by the new driver. This is a good way to teach responsibility and accountability to a young person. Young people love to be independent, but as a parent, you need to make sure that they are walking the line between independence and responsibility. Doing so ensures that your teen driver can act like an adult within limits that are suitable for teenagers.

Teen Texting and Driving

Teen Texting and Driving
Getting a license is a milestone every teenager anticipates, but new drivers face more dangers than ever before. With all the recent headlines about the dangers of distracted drivers, parents are scrambling for ways to stop their kids from texting while driving. According to this report by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 20 percent of drivers between the ages of 18 to 20 claim that texting while driving has no effect on their ability to drive, but that same age group has the highest crash rate of all drivers. As a parent, how can you prevent your teen from becoming another statistic?

Getting a license is a milestone every teenager anticipates, but new drivers face more dangers than ever before. With all the recent headlines about the dangers of distracted drivers, parents are scrambling for ways to stop their kids from texting while driving. According to this report by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 20 percent of drivers between the ages of 18 to 20 claim that texting while driving has no effect on their ability to drive, but that same age group has the highest crash rate of all drivers. As a parent, how can you prevent your teen from becoming another statistic?

Lead by Example

The first thing every parent should do is set a good example. If you text, email or make calls while you drive, your teenager will assume that it is acceptable behavior and be much more likely to follow suit.

Talk to Your Teen

You may find that your teen is unaware of how risky texting and driving really is. Lay out published statistics so that he or she will understand that these dangers are real.

Good Driver Rewards

Give your teen positive reinforcement to encourage good driving. Rewards are proven to be one of the most effective ways to promote good habits, so negotiate with him or her to establish reasonable incentives for driving safely.

Smartphone Monitoring

There are many mobile apps available today that will allow you to keep track of your teen's driving habits. Most of these apps come with a small monthly subscription, and they will send you alerts if your teen is speeding or texting while in a car.

Be Authoritative

Texting while driving can be more deadly than drinking and driving, so do not hesitate to punish your teen for engaging in this dangerous behavior. Make a zero-tolerance rule and enforce it strongly. Punishment may seem harsh, but it can save lives. Texting while driving is dangerous, and it is also illegal in many states. Your teen could risk hefty fines or even lose their license for violating the law. To make sure you know the law in your state, Free DMV Practice Tests offers cheat sheets to help you learn what rules apply.

Hardship Licenses for Teens

Hardship licenses are issued to 14 or 15 year-old teens who qualify for hardship status and are too young to get a normal driver�۪s license. The requirements vary from state to state, and some states do not offer hardship licenses. They are mainly used in rural areas. Hardship licenses also require driver�۪s tests, and taking a DMV practice test can improve your advantage.

Hardship licenses are issued to 14 or 15 year-old teens who qualify for hardship status and are too young to get a normal driver�۪s license. The requirements vary from state to state, and some states do not offer hardship licenses. They are mainly used in rural areas. Hardship licenses also require driver�۪s tests, and taking a DMV practice test can improve your advantage.

The General Requirements for a Hardship License for Teens

The specific criteria for hardship licenses differ by state, but the general requirements include the need to: �ۢ Drive to and from school- this usually means the school is a specific number of miles away and not just down the street �ۢ Drive to and from work- there must be a minimum number of working hours �ۢ Long-term medical reasons- this does not include routine medical visits

The Application Process

Applicants must provide proof of their hardship and give the reasons they need the license. They must also provide proof of school attendance and job verification. In most states, the application will need to be notarized. Applicants will most likely need proof of U.S. citizenship or lawful permanent residence status and primary and secondary proof of identity.

Restrictions

The restrictions vary by state, but a hardship license does not allow you to drive wherever and whenever you want. There will be destinations that are pre-authorized, and passengers will be limited to only family members. There is also usually a mileage limitation for each drive, but this will also vary by state. The license will also only be valid during daylight hours. In most states, if the driver is driving at unauthorized times, such as after dark, on an unapproved route or with unauthorized passengers, their license can be suspended. A DMV practice test can help a teen driver do well on the tests they will need to pass to qualify for the hardship license. They will need to pass a vision test, a road test and a knowledge test. Taking a DMV practice test will give you an advantage as will reading about the problems other drivers have encountered.

Navigating the Graduated Licensing Process

A graduated driver's license program has been introduced by many states as a way to make the process of getting a driver's license a little more involved for teenagers. The reason for this is because young drivers are much more likely to have an automobile accident than any other age group. According to the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, motor vehicle accidents are the main cause of death for people between 13 and 19 years old. If you are a young driver, the GDL program gives you more time to study, take DMV practice tests and learn safe road practices before acquiring full driving privileges.

A graduated driver's license program has been introduced by many states as a way to make the process of getting a driver's license a little more involved for teenagers. The reason for this is because young drivers are much more likely to have an automobile accident than any other age group. According to the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, motor vehicle accidents are the main cause of death for people between 13 and 19 years old. If you are a young driver, the GDL program gives you more time to study, take DMV practice tests and learn safe road practices before acquiring full driving privileges.

Three Stages

In 2011, the U.S. established minimum federal requirements for GDL laws that are enacted by state governments. Most states impose a three-stage process. The first stage is the supervised learner's period. The second stage is called intermediate or provisional and limits unsupervised driving in very high-risk situations such as expressways. The final stage is a full-privilege driver's license. This process is designed to allow your judgment to mature in the hope that you will develop proper driving practices by the time you are 18.

Requirements for a GDL

The District of Columbia and 47 states have adopted a GDL program. The characteristics include: �ۢ You must be 15.5 years old for a learner's permit. �ۢ You must wait at least three months before applying for an intermediate license and be 16 years to obtain an intermediate license. �ۢ You should have at least 30 hours of supervised driving. �ۢ You must be at least 17 years old to obtain a full license. �ۢ There are restrictions on nighttime driving, expressway driving and carrying passengers.

Prepare to Drive

You can take driver training courses from professional instructors to prepare to earn a permit or license. You can also take a DMV practice test to get an idea about the written test you will have to pass. The GDL program provides enough driving practice to help you develop the required driving skills to drive safely for years to come.

Things Teen Drivers Need To Consider When Moving Out Of State

Things Teen Drivers Need To Consider When Moving Out Of State
"Teenagers naturally have a lot on their mind. They need to stay on top of their schoolwork, find time to work and maintain a social life. With a driver's license, it is much easier for a teenager to get where they need to be on time. If your life gets more complicated with a move to another state, what is important to know about driving laws in your new home?

Teenagers naturally have a lot on their mind. They need to stay on top of their schoolwork, find time to work and maintain a social life. With a driver's license, it is much easier for a teenager to get where they need to be on time. If your life gets more complicated with a move to another state, what is important to know about driving laws in your new home?

Learn the State Laws for Drivers Under the Age of 18

Different states have different laws regarding when teenagers can drive and whether they can have passengers in the car. Therefore, it is a good idea to make sure you are familiar with state laws regarding drivers under the age of 18. If you are a minor who has earned full driving privileges in your former home state, those privileges may not transfer to your new state.

You May Face Extra Requirements to Get Your License in a New State

Some states only require you to be 16 years of age and have your learner's permit before applying for a license. Other states impose additional qualifications prior to getting a license. For example, the state of New York requires that you have at least 30 hours of supervised driving before you apply at the DMV. In North Carolina, you must have a provisional license before you can apply for a full license if you are under the age of 18.

Learn Where You Can Go for Help Getting Your License

Getting your license may require passing a written test as well as passing a road test. The good news is that you can take a free DMV practice test beforehand to make sure you're prepared to take the real test. As a teenager you may have a lot on your plate, but you still have a responsibility to understand the laws regarding teenage drivers in your new state. Make sure to go online or to the DMV to brush up on the new laws that you will have to abide by on the road.��

What To Expect in Drivers Education

Driver's education courses make it easier for a young driver to get an unconditional license or save money on auto insurance. In many states, passing such a course is required for a driver under 18 to obtain a license at all. If you enroll in driver's education courses, what can you expect from them?

Driver's education courses make it easier for a young driver to get an unconditional license or save money on auto insurance. In many states, passing such a course is required for a driver under 18 to obtain a license at all. If you enroll in driver's education courses, what can you expect from them?

Learn About Good Driving

In driver's education, you will be taught the best practices for how to be a safe and courteous driver on the road. Your instructors will spend time in a classroom and possibly a driving simulator teaching you the basics of how to drive. In the classroom, you will learn the theory behind defensive driving, who has right of way in a given situation and the meanings of various road signs.

Learn How to Drive Safely on the Road

After you have spent time in the classroom, you will spend time driving an actual vehicle. This gives you quality time on the road to learn about and react to different driving situations as they come up. In most cases, you will be driving a vehicle with an automatic transmission to make it easier on you.

Prepare for Your Road Test

Your driver's education program may devote time to helping you pass your official road test. At the conclusion of your driver's education course, you will have valuable insight as to your strengths and weaknesses behind the wheel. Along with a DMV practice test to help you pass your written test for a license, this information can help you improve and refine your skills before taking your actual road test. Driver's education courses can help you learn a lot about being safe on the road. As a new driver, it is important that you understand the rules of the road and can abide by them. Whether you have your license or are still striving for it, it is never a bad idea to brush up on your skills or break bad habits while you are still young.

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