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Teen Drivers

Teen Driving Privileges

Teen drivers need guidance and guidelines when they first get their driver's licenses. This is because they are still inexperienced and are largely unable to pay for a car or the expenses that go with it. Until they prove that they can handle driving and paying for a car what guidelines should parents put in place?
Teen drivers need guidance and guidelines when they first get their driver's licenses. This is because they are still inexperienced and are largely unable to pay for a car or the expenses that go with it. Until they prove that they can handle driving and paying for a car what guidelines should parents put in place?

Teen drivers need guidance and guidelines when they first get their driver's licenses. This is because they are still inexperienced and are largely unable to pay for a car or the expenses that go with it. Until they prove that they can handle driving and paying for a car what guidelines should parents put in place?

Your Teen Should Only Get the Car at Designated Times

If your teen is driving your car he or she should only get the car at times that you designate. For example your son or daughter should be allowed to drive the car to work or to approved addresses where your teen spends time. This ensures that you have the car when you need it and that your teen driver isn't going anywhere without your permission.

School and Work Come First

Driving privileges should only be awarded when your teen does well in school and has a job. If work or school performance starts to suffer the car is off limits until your son or daughter is performing up to predetermined expectations.

The Use of the Car or Ability to Drive Is Probationary

Teens need to understand that there is no excuse for unsafe driving. If your teen gets into an accident is caught driving under the influence or gets a speeding ticket the right to drive should be taken away temporarily. This is for your son or daughter's safety as well as to keep your insurance premiums at a reasonable level. A parent may ask their child to study the state driver's manual or take a DMV practice test before restoring driving privileges to ensure that they demonstrate knowledge of the rules of the road. Parents of teenage drivers have a lot to worry about when it comes to their teen driving on his or her own. However setting guidelines can make it easier for parents to have a level of control over what their kids do when they are behind the wheel of an automobile.

Graduated Driver Licensing Programs for Teen Drivers

If your teen is about to start driving what should you know as a parent about graduated driver&#39
If your teen is about to start driving what should you know as a parent about graduated driver's licenses? It is important for you and your teen to understand the rules when they can drive. When Can Your Kids Drive? Most states mandate that your child does not drive alone on the the road during the overnight hours. While some states mandate that minors cannot drive after dark many states demand that teen drivers are off of the road by nine p.m. Looking at a DMV practice test can help you become familiar with the rules that your teenage driver has to follow.

If your teen is about to start driving what should you know as a parent about graduated driver's licenses? It is important for you and your teen to understand the rules when they can drive.

When Can Your Kids Drive?

Most states mandate that your child does not drive alone on the the road during the overnight hours. While some states mandate that minors cannot drive after dark many states demand that teen drivers are off of the road by nine p.m. Looking at a DMV practice test can help you become familiar with the rules that your teenage driver has to follow.

Can Your Kids Have Passengers in the Car?

Minors who have a provisional driver's license in certain states may be restricted to the type of passengers they can have in the car. Some states require that your teen driver has no one in the car at all after dark. In some cases your teen driver may be able to have passengers in the car as long as they are over the age of 18 or 21.

Are There Exceptions to the Rules?

There may be exceptions to the rules. For example a teen driver may be able to drive to work or to a sporting event in which the teenager is participating in. The school district or teen's employer must issue a letter or another notice that your son or daughter has the right to be on the road late at night. Without such written permission you may need to pick up your son or daughter from work or a school event if that event runs late. It is a great day when your son or daughter receives his or her driver's license. However it is important that you as well as your teen understand your new driver's limitations under the law. Understanding the law makes it easier to keep your teen safe and abiding by the law at all times.

Parenting Guide for Parents of Teen Drivers

The moment that your teen driver receives his or learner's permit is a moment that you won't soon forget. As much as you love your child	 you also can't help worrying about what might happen when your teenager hits the open road. While you'll typically take the time to show your teen the basics of driving	 work with your younger driver on different types of roads and ensure that your teenager reads all the testing materials carefully	 you also want to take the time to sit down and discuss the po
The moment that your teen driver receives his or learner's permit is a moment that you won't soon forget. As much as you love your child you also can't help worrying about what might happen when your teenager hits the open road. While you'll typically take the time to show your teen the basics of driving work with your younger driver on different types of roads and ensure that your teenager reads all the testing materials carefully you also want to take the time to sit down and discuss the potential hazards with your new driver.

The moment that your teen driver receives his or learner's permit is a moment that you won't soon forget. As much as you love your child you also can't help worrying about what might happen when your teenager hits the open road. While you'll typically take the time to show your teen the basics of driving work with your younger driver on different types of roads and ensure that your teenager reads all the testing materials carefully you also want to take the time to sit down and discuss the potential hazards with your new driver.

Drinking and Driving

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 22 percent of all teenagers over the age of 15 were part of an accident involving drinking and driving. As a parent you need to make your children understand the dangers of driving while under the influence of alcohol or any type of drug. Drugs and alcohol lower your reaction time impair your decision making skills and give you a fuzzy or cloudy mind. Free DMV Practice Tests has an abundance of information that you can share with your teen including the drinking and driving laws in different states and which states have zero tolerance laws in place.

Distracted Driving

Distracted driving is just as potentially dangerous as driving while intoxicated. Most people think of distracted driving as driving while texting or talking on a cell phone but it can also include talking to friends putting on makeup or even playing with a tablet or music player while driving. It only takes a second for an accident to happen and that second can come when your teen takes their eyes off the road to change a song or talk to a friend.

After an Accident

As a parent the most important step you can take involves teaching your child what to do after an accident. Teens should always carry proof of car insurance a cellphone and an emergency kit with flares and other signaling devices. Teaching your teen which steps to take after an accident or emergency situation can help you breathe a little easier.

Arriving Alive: Prom Night Safety for Teen Drivers

The prom is one of the biggest nights in a teenager's life but the event can become tragic if you don't drive safely. Night driving is an extra challenge of its own and a party with friends can cause distractions to a driver but you will have no problems if you follow these five tips.
The prom is one of the biggest nights in a teenager's life but the event can become tragic if you don't drive safely. Night driving is an extra challenge of its own and a party with friends can cause distractions to a driver but you will have no problems if you follow these five tips.

The prom is one of the biggest nights in a teenager's life but the event can become tragic if you don't drive safely. Night driving is an extra challenge of its own and a party with friends can cause distractions to a driver but you will have no problems if you follow these five tips.

1. Everyone Wears Seat Belts While an accident is the last thing that you want to happen during prom night it is always best to be prepared. If everyone is wearing a seat belt then you will greatly reduce the risk of someone getting injured should a collision occur.

2. Limit Distractions A distracted driver is far more likely to get into an accident than someone completely focused on the road. The best way to limit distractions while driving on prom night is by limiting the number of people you let ride in your car.

3. No Drinking and Driving Even if others tempt you to consume alcohol on prom night you should never drink and drive. Not only is drinking illegal for teenagers but it will also drastically reduce your reaction time when you are behind the wheel.

4. Don't Stay Out Too Late Driving while extremely tired has almost the same effect as driving while intoxicated. Every teenager wants to get the party going all nigh but there is no need to get back on the road after 2 a.m. You should either be done for the night or at your final location by this time to avoid getting into an accident.

5. Get a Limo The best possible option for arriving alive on prom night may be hiring a limo service. Not only will this allow you to spend the entire time with your friends but you will also eliminate all of the dangers of driving on prom night. It may require saving some money but a limo will allow you to party on prom night while still staying safe. You will be envied by every other kid at school when they see you pull up in a limo.

Teen Driving Privileges

Teen drivers need guidance and guidelines when they first get their driver's licenses. This is because they are still inexperienced and are largely unable to pay for a car or the expenses that go with it. Until they prove that they can handle driving and paying for a car, what guidelines should parents put in place?
Teen drivers need guidance and guidelines when they first get their driver's licenses. This is because they are still inexperienced and are largely unable to pay for a car or the expenses that go with it. Until they prove that they can handle driving and paying for a car, what guidelines should parents put in place?

Teen drivers need guidance and guidelines when they first get their driver's licenses. This is because they are still inexperienced and are largely unable to pay for a car or the expenses that go with it. Until they prove that they can handle driving and paying for a car, what guidelines should parents put in place?

Your Teen Should Only Get the Car at Designated Times

If your teen is driving your car, he or she should only get the car at times that you designate. For example, your son or daughter should be allowed to drive the car to work or to approved addresses where your teen spends time. This ensures that you have the car when you need it and that your teen driver isn't going anywhere without your permission.

School and Work Come First

Driving privileges should only be awarded when your teen does well in school and has a job. If work or school performance starts to suffer, the car is off limits until your son or daughter is performing up to predetermined expectations.

The Use of the Car or Ability to Drive Is Probationary

Teens need to understand that there is no excuse for unsafe driving. If your teen gets into an accident, is caught driving under the influence or gets a speeding ticket, the right to drive should be taken away temporarily. This is for your son or daughter's safety as well as to keep your insurance premiums��at a reasonable level. A parent may ask their child to study the state driver's manual or take a DMV practice test before restoring driving privileges to ensure that they demonstrate knowledge of the rules of the road. Parents of teenage drivers have a lot to worry about when it comes to their teen driving on his or her own. However, setting guidelines can make it easier for parents to have a level of control over what their kids do when they are behind the wheel of an automobile.

Teen Drinking and Driving

If you are the parent or guardian of a teen who will soon be testing to receive his or her driver's license, then you may be understandably nervous. After all, you care greatly about your child's safety and worry about him or her being behind the wheel. Still, it is a teen's rite of passage to obtain a driver's license, which means all you can do is prepare him or her to be as safe as possible on the road.

If you are the parent or guardian of a teen who will soon be testing to receive his or her driver's license, then you may be understandably nervous. After all, you care greatly about your child's safety and worry about him or her being behind the wheel. Still, it is a teen's rite of passage to obtain a driver's license, which means all you can do is prepare him or her to be as safe as possible on the road. One hazard that many parents may not consider when they speak to their teens about the inherent responsibilities that come along with having a driver's license is avoiding drugs and alcohol. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, teen drinking and driving is a surprisingly common cause of teenage vehicle collisions, responsible for more than 20 percent of fatal car crashes involving drivers under 21 years old. Getting into an accident because of drinking and driving can not only cause serious injury or even death but could also result in your teen being stuck with a DUI on his or her record, which could affect future employment and education. Because of this, it is important for parents to speak with their teens about the importance of resisting peer pressure to try drugs and alcohol. This is especially true of teens who have their driver's licenses and could be putting themselves and others at severe risk by drinking and driving. It is also important for parents to note that laws and penalties regarding teens drinking and driving can vary greatly from state to state, which is why it is recommended that all parents find out more about state-specific teen drinking and driving laws that may apply to their children. Free DMV Practice Tests offers a number of helpful resources for prospective drivers, including a useful DMV practice test to help teens review traffic regulations. Be sure to check it out for yourself and share this information with your teen to help him or her stay safe and responsible behind the wheel.

What To Do If Your Teen Driver Moves To A New State During Driver's Training

teen drivers license requirements in new state
Getting a driver's license is a new, exciting and typically nerve-wracking experience for parents of a teenage driver. The process can be complicated when the new driver moves to a different state while studying for the driving exam. You will need to learn what qualifications will be required of your teen driver in the new state of residence. However, the basics of safe, responsible driving are important regardless of the state in which a new teen driver resides.

Getting a driver's license is a new, exciting and typically nerve-wracking experience for parents of a teenage driver. The process can be complicated when the new driver moves to a different state while studying for the driving exam. You will need to learn what qualifications will be required of your teen driver in the new state of residence. However, the basics of safe, responsible driving are important regardless of the state in which a new teen driver resides.

Focus on the Basics

No matter where a teen earns his or her first driver's license, the basics about driving remain the same. Safety guidelines vary little from state to state, and important concepts such as when to turn on headlights or how close to follow another vehicle will not likely change based on where you live. If your student driver began a driver's education class that is not required in the new state of residence, this doesn't mean that time or money has been wasted. Think instead of the class as an investment in the future safety of your teen.

Learn Your New State's Requirements

While all 50 states require teens to take both a written exam and practical driving test, preparation requirements differ depending on the state. Check with your local DMV to discover whether driver's education classes are required in your new state. Also, be sure to obtain a copy of your new state's driving handbook. Certain laws such as those involving turns, passing and lane changes do vary from state to state. Both you and your student driver will need to be aware of the traffic laws in your new home.

Study for the Written Exam

Once you've obtained a copy of your new state's driving handbook, help your teen study for the written examination. If required by your current state of residence, enroll your son or daughter in a driver's education class to learn and practice the basics. To prepare even further, encourage your teen driver to take a DMV practice test to make sure they know all the important traffic laws.

Teaching Your Teen To Drive Safely

Safe Driving for Teens
As a parent of a teen driver, it is only natural that you worry about your child and the idea of him or her getting behind the wheel of a several-ton vehicle. However, there are plenty of steps you can take toward teaching your child safe driving habits, so that you can enjoy greater peace of mind once he or she inevitably obtains a driver's license. Many parents are most worried about the possibility of their teens getting into an accident, especially since a teen's first few years of driving tend to be the most likely time for a collision to occur. Parents should set their minds at ease--at least a little--by learning that the majority of accidents that involve teen drivers do not result in serious injury. You can help to prevent your teen from engaging in unsafe driving habits by sitting down and having a talk with them about driver safety. Here are some tips you may wish to arm your own child with.

As a parent of a teen driver, it is only natural that you worry about your child and the idea of him or her getting behind the wheel of a several-ton vehicle. However, there are plenty of steps you can take toward teaching your child safe driving habits, so that you can enjoy greater peace of mind once he or she inevitably obtains a driver's license. Many parents are most worried about the possibility of their teens getting into an accident, especially since a teen's first few years of driving tend to be the most likely time for a collision to occur. Parents should set their minds at ease--at least a little--by learning that the majority of accidents that involve teen drivers do not result in serious injury. You can help to prevent your teen from engaging in unsafe driving habits by sitting down and having a talk with them about driver safety. Here are some tips you may wish to arm your own child with.

Keep a Roadside Emergency Kit

In the event of an accident or breakdown, having an emergency kit can help to avoid a situation from getting worse. For example, if your teen gets a flat tire on the side of a dark road, having an emergency kit with road flares, cones and tools for changing a tire can get them back on the road with a spare as soon as possible while remaining visible to other drivers.

Don't Drive Distracted

Unfortunately, there's an increasing number of vehicle collisions involving teen drivers are caused by distracted driving. Have your teen take a vow to never text and drive, and minimize distractions in the car by limiting the number of friends your teen is allowed to have as passengers at any given time.

Study for the Test

Many other useful teen driving tips were likely covered in your child's driving preparation course, so encourage him or her to do plenty of studying for the test. Have your teen take this road signs practice test or even a DMV practice test online.

Graduated Driver Licensing Programs For Teen Drivers

Teen License laws

"If your teen is about to start driving, what should you know as a parent about graduated driver's licenses? It is important for you and your teen to understand the rules when they can drive.

When Can Your Kids Drive?

Most states mandate that your child does not drive alone on the the road during the overnight hours. While some states mandate that minors cannot drive after dark, many states demand that teen drivers are off of the road by nine p.m. Looking at a DMV practice test can help you become familiar with the rules that your teenage driver has to follow.

Can Your Kids Have Passengers in the Car?

Minors who have a provisional driver's license in certain states may be restricted to the type of passengers they can have in the car. Some states require that your teen driver has no one in the car at all after dark. In some cases, your teen driver may be able to have passengers in the car as long as they are over the age of 18 or 21.

Are There Exceptions to the Rules?

There may be exceptions to the rules. For example, a teen driver may be able to drive to work or to a sporting event in which the teenager is participating in. The school district or teen's employer must issue a letter or another notice that your son or daughter has the right to be on the road late at night. Without such written permission, you may need to pick up your son or daughter from work or a school event if that event runs late. It is a great day when your son or daughter receives his or her driver's license. However, it is important that you as well as your teen understand your new driver's limitations under the law. Understanding the law makes it easier to keep your teen safe and abiding by the law at all times. "

Basic Car Maintenance Every Teen Driver Should Know

Car Maintenance for teens
Many teens get their driver's license even without knowing anything about basic car maintenance. However, this knowledge can save them from a lot of headaches, and more importantly, from dangerous situations. For their own good, teens should know how to do the following.

Many teens get their driving permit��or even their drivers license without knowing anything about basic car maintenance. However, this knowledge can save them from a lot of headaches, and more importantly, from dangerous situations. For their own good, teens should know how to do the following:


1. Taking proper care of tires
Teach your teenage kids to keep their tires properly inflated at all times. Advice them to check their tires whenever they stop for gas. Instill this tip in their minds until they make a habit of it. Tires have a minimum and maximum pressure that all drivers should be aware of. Keeping within these limits significantly improves gas mileage. On the other hand, overinflated and underinflated tires wear out unevenly, resulting to shorter shelf life, which in turn leads to more frequent replacements. This costs more money, and also puts teens in danger of getting a busted tire while driving.

2. Changing the engine oil
Regularly changing the engine oil is an important maintenance task that all drivers -- including teens -- should know. This keeps the engine working in top condition. Failure to change oil will result in the accumulation of dirt and other contaminants, making the oil unable to lubricate the engine properly. As a result, the engine will wear out and fail much sooner than it should. Thus, teach your teenage kids how to change oil. It will take them only around half an hour to perform this task.

3. Checking the coolant
An overheated engine can suddenly stop at an inconvenient time and place. It's frustrating when this happens, especially since it's a scenario that can easily be avoided. Make sure to prop up the hood open and show your teenage kids where the coolant is and teach them how to check whether or not it's within range. It's a very easy and quick task that will save them a load of trouble caused by inadequate maintenance.

4. Knowing what the dashboard warning light means
The dashboard helpfully displays warning lights when something is working improperly or running low.�� These lights will inform teens when the oil needs to be changed, the engine needs to be checked, etc. Teach your teenage kids what these warnings means, and more importantly, teach them the right thing to do. You can refer to the owner's manual for the correct response for every warning light.

5. Monitoring the fuel gauge
Running out of fuel is a simple mistake, but it's such a hassle if this happens miles away from the nearest gas station. Teach your kids not to procrastinate when it comes to getting fuel. As much as possible, keep at least a quarter tank of gas or diesel, especially when driving over long distances.

6. Keeping the lights shining brightly
Drivers use the car lights to communicate with fellow drivers, so driving with faulty or broken lights can lead to accidents. Your teenage kids should understand that when they have problems with lights, they should get those fixed or replaced right away. To make sure that the lights are working properly, tell your teenage kids to perform a�� weekly check at night.

7. Cleaning the car
A regular car wash will make a vehicle cleaner and safer. A dirty windshield can get in the way of driving especially in conditions with less-than-ideal visibility, such as rain, fog, or nightfall. Even teens with perfect vision will have a harder time navigating with a dirty windshield. Advise your teenage kids to get regular car washes -- or wash their cars themselves. Also, tell them to keep a bottle of washer fluid in the trunk in case they need to clean off a splattered bug, or sticky bird's poo.

As a parent, you play a big part in molding your teenage kids to become responsible drivers. They will carry over what they learn in their teenage years to adulthood. Remember, responsible drivers are not born; they're made.

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