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Cell Phone Laws

What You Need to Know about Texas Cell Phone Laws

Cell phone and texting laws differ from state to state, and novice drivers need to learn these laws not only to pass their driving text, but also to stay safe and legal on the roads. Since these laws in states like Texas specifically apply to young or novice drivers, its important to know how they apply so you dont get caught doing something illegal on the roads, and have something on your driving record.

Cell phone and texting laws differ from state to state, and novice drivers need to learn these laws not only to pass their driving text, but also to stay safe and legal on the roads. Since these laws in states like Texas specifically apply to young or novice drivers, its important to know how they apply so you dont get caught doing something illegal on the roads, and have something on your driving record.

What are the Laws for Novice Drivers?

In Texas, there isnt a primary ban on cell phone use or texting while driving, except in school zones. Meaning, once teen drivers have their license for at least one year, texting and cell phone use isnt against the law (but still shouldnt be done while driving anyway). However, teens with permits, or with a license for less than one year, will be cited if caught texting or using a cell phone.
These cell phone and texting laws in Texas are primary enforcement, meaning the texting or the cell phone us is enough for an officer to pull you over to give you a ticket. No other traffic offense needs to take place. In Texas, it wont be enough to say that you were going the speed limit or did stop for that stop sign to get out of a citation. There is such a thing a secondary enforcement, where the officer can only count the cell phone as an infraction only if you committed another violation (speeding, running a red light etc.)

Why Is it Important to Know These Laws?

These laws are important for young drivers to know not only to keep a clean driving record and to stay safe on the roads, but cell phone and texting laws also appear on the Texas DPS driving test. The test may cover things like road signs, passing rules, and emergency procedure, but these laws could also appear on thetest.
Overall, cell phone and texting laws primarily apply to novice drivers because of their inexperience on the road and their higher rate of accidents and fatalities. Any and every law thats been put in place to protect young drivers behind the wheel ought to be known and abided by. In 2010, 46 people lost their lives in cell phone related crashes, and nearly 3,400 accidents were caused by cell phone use. By following cell phone and texting laws, you wont end up as a statistic.

New Driving Laws in Illinois

Speeding in Illinois Can Be Costly As of January 1, 2010, the State of Illinois enacted new legislation targeting people who are guilty excessive speeding. Law enforcement officers will no longer just be issuing a citation to drivers. Anyone who operates a motor vehicle over a certain limit will be facing the following criminal charges:

Speeding in Illinois Can Be Costly

As of January 1, 2010, the State of Illinois enacted new legislation targeting people who are guilty excessive speeding. Law enforcement officers will no longer just be issuing a citation to drivers. Anyone who operates a motor vehicle over a certain limit will be facing the following criminal charges: Class B Misdemeanor Offense Any driver found speeding in excess of 30 miles per hour over the speed limit faces a penalty of up to six months in county jail and a fine of $1,500. Class A Misdemeanor Offense Any driver found speeding in excess of 40 miles per hour over the speed limit faces a penalty of up to one year in county jail and a fine of $2,500. These are serious criminal charges and will require the expertise of an attorney who practices law specializing in motor vehicle offenses.

Highland Park Bans Handheld Cell Phones

The City of Highland Park has passed a new law that goes into effect on June 1, 2011. The City Council voted to prohibit all drivers from using a handheld cell phone while operating a motor vehicle. Offenders will be issued a citation and required to pay a fine of up to $75. This is a primary offense, which means that police officers don't need an additional reason to pull you over. If they see you using a handheld phone, they will be stopping you for an infraction.

Cell Phones & Text Messaging

Effective January 1, 2011, all drivers are prohibited from operating a motor vehicle on any roadway while using an electronic communication device unless the device is used in a hands-free or voice-activated mode. This new legislation defines an electronic communication as any type of personal digital assistant, mobile computer or wireless phone, not just handheld cell phones.

When to Get Legal Help From an Illinois Attorney

The current laws in Illinois make it illegal for all drivers under the age of 19 to operate a motor vehicle while using any type of wireless phone, with or without hands-free accessories. Text messaging, emailing and using the Internet while driving is unlawful for drivers of any age. If you have been issued a citation or are facing criminal traffic charges, contact an experienced Illinois attorney for legal advice immediately.

Arizona Driving Cell Phone Driving Laws

Arizona Driving Laws for 2011, including New Legislation Pending in Arizona, such as Senate Bill 1538 , House Bill 2446, and Senate Bill 1111. These new driving laws will affect all drivers.

Arizona Driving Laws for 2011 and beyond

Driving under the influence (DUI) of drugs or alcohol used to be the number one cause for fatal auto accidents. Every state in the nation now makes it a crime to operate a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol level (BAC) of .08 or higher. Laws were passed to make the DUI penalties much harsher. People are hit with mandatory jail time and huge fines. Their license is often suspended and in some states they are required to install an ignition interlock device in their cars. Recent studies by many researchers have found that distracted driving is even more dangerous than driving while intoxicated. Yet there are few laws that make it a crime to send text messages while driving. A recent road test conducted by Car and Driver Magazine showed that texting drivers were four times slower to hit the brakes than people impaired by alcohol. The current laws in Arizona prohibit all school bus drivers from using a cell phone while driving. In the City of Phoenix, it is illegal for any driver to engage in text messaging. Violators will be fined $100 or $250 if their actions caused an accident. Legislators are now introducing new bills in the Arizona House and Senate to deal with some of these issues.

New Legislation Pending in Arizona

In July 2009, Robert Okerblom's son was killed by a woman who was texting while driving. He is using his story to help two Arizona State Capitol senators pass legislation that would outlaw texting while driving.

Senate Bill 1538

Senator Al Melvin is sponsoring Senate Bill 1538, also known as the No Texting While Driving Act. If this bill gets passed, it would make it illegal to compose, read or send text messages from any electronic device while operating a motor vehicle. Violators could be hit with fines ranging from $50 to $200. This was approved by the Senate on March 15, 2011 and has now been sent to the House Committee for approval.

House Bill 2426

Representative Steve Farley has introduced House Bill 2426, which seeks to ban all drivers under the age of 18 from using a cell phone while driving. He says that the dangers are multiplied when an inexperienced driver is distracted. This proposed legislation may be easier to enforce because any police officer that sees a teen using a cell phone while driving can issue a citation.

Senate Bill 1111

This bill seeks to outlaw the use of any handheld wireless device while driving. Offenders would be hit with the following fines: First Offense $100 fine Second Offense $250 fine and community service Third Offense $500 fine and community service

Get Legal Help From an Arizona Attorney

Whether you have been issued a citation for a driving infraction or charged with a misdemeanor offense, it is best to seek legal help. An experienced attorney may be able to get the charges reduced or dismissed altogether. Contact an Arizona traffic lawyer for advice regarding your specific case.

New Driving Laws in Georgia

New Cell Phone Laws in Georgia, the State of Georgia has recently enacted new legislation regarding the use of cell phones while driving. House Bill 23 for drivers under the age of 18, and Senate Bill 360 which is for drivers of any age.

New Cell Phone Laws in Georgia The State of Georgia has recently enacted new legislation regarding the use of cell phones while driving. House Bill 23 prohibits any person 18 years of age or younger from using any wireless communication device to send or receive text messages while operating a motor vehicle. Anyone caught violating this new law will be fined $150 and receive four points against their driver's license. The second law that was signed by Georgia Governor Perdue is Senate Bill 360. This forbids all drivers of any age from texting while operating a motor vehicle. Also known as the Caleb Sorohan Act, it was named after the 18-year old who was killed December 15, 2009. He crashed head-on into another vehicle while texting on his cell phone. Violators will receive one point on their driver's license and fined $150. Both of these new laws went into effect as of July 1, 2010.

Additional & Proposed Legislation

As of January 2010, Georgia now prohibits all school bus drivers from using any mobile or wireless communication device if one or more children are on the bus. House Bill 938 This proposed legislation would ban drivers from sending or reading text messages while operating a motor vehicle. The penalties would include a fine ranging from $50 to $100, plus two points on their driver's license. Currently the bill is still under review because lawmakers are struggling with how the laws would be enforced by police officers. House Bill 940 Seeks to limit students use of electronic devices while they are riding on a school bus. House Bill 944 This would prohibit all drivers from emailing and texting with a fine of $300. House Bill 945 The use of cell phones and any other device with texting capabilities would be illegal for anyone operating a motor vehicle on state highways and roads. A fine of up to $300 would be imposed. House Bill 67 This would outlaw the use of handheld mobile devices by all drivers.

Consult a Georgia Attorney For Advice

The laws are constantly changing in Georgia and it may be difficult to keep up with all of the new rules. Any driver 18 or younger can be pulled over by the police for using a cell phone. Law enforcement officials do not need a secondary reason, such as speeding or expired registration tags to pull you over. If they see you using any type of mobile device while driving, you can be issued a citation.

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