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Driving Laws

What Is an Enhanced Drivers License and Why Do You Need One?

If you live in a state that borders Canada, you may already know that it is harder to cross the border than it was a few years ago. The good news is that an enhanced drivers license can make it easier to get to Canada for drivers in the United States.
If you live in a state that borders Canada, you may already know that it is harder to cross the border than it was a few years ago. The good news is that an enhanced drivers license can make it easier to get to Canada for drivers in the United States.

If you live in a state that borders Canada, you may already know that it is harder to cross the border than it was a few years ago. The good news is that an enhanced drivers license can make it easier to get to Canada for drivers in the United States.

What Is an Enhanced Drivers License?

An enhanced drivers license is a hybrid between a drivers license and a passport. By showing the license to border patrol agents, you can cross into the country with less scrutiny. The enhanced license adheres to Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI) guidelines and is also good when entering Canada by sea.

Which States Have the Enhanced License?

Currently, four states have this form of license. Those states are New York, Michigan, Vermont and Washington. There is an extra fee to get the enhanced license that varies depending on which state you get it in.

Why Would You Need This License?

An enhanced license can be very handy to various individuals. An enhanced license will list your name and picture as well as your citizenship. This reduces the amount of time that may have to spend answering questions about who you are and your reasons for entering Canada. If you cross the border often for business or pleasure, you can save yourself a lot of time on each trip. Due to security concerns, it is not as easy to cross the border into Canada as it once was. However, with an enhanced license, you make it much easier on yourself to enter the country whenever you travel by land or sea. If you are a resident of a state that offers this type of license, you can obtain one by renewing your license online or at any DMV location.

Considerations For Active Duty Military Drivers Moving Out Of State

If you are in the military, it�۪s likely that you move around every two years or so. When you are on temporary assignment, you can drive in a state without any issue as long as you have a driver�۪s license elsewhere in the country. However, if you move to that new state, you will need to get a driver�۪s license in that state. This means that you will need to take a DMV practice test to prepare you for the knowledge test that you will be given.
If you are in the military, it�۪s likely that you move around every two years or so. When you are on temporary assignment, you can drive in a state without any issue as long as you have a driver�۪s license elsewhere in the country. However, if you move to that new state, you will need to get a driver�۪s license in that state. This means that you will need to take a DMV practice test to prepare you for the knowledge test that you will be given.

If you are in the military, it�۪s likely that you move around every two years or so. When you are on temporary assignment, you can drive in a state without any issue as long as you have a driver�۪s license elsewhere in the country. However, if you move to that new state, you will need to get a driver�۪s license in that state. This means that you will need to take a DMV practice test to prepare you for the knowledge test that you will be given.

What You Need to Know

When you are active duty military, you have the same requirements as everyone else on the road. You will need to visit the DMV as soon as you have officially moved into a new state in order to obtain a driver�۪s license. Depending on the state, you will need to do the following:

  • Pay a fee
  • Take the vision test
  • Take the knowledge test

The knowledge test is going to ensure that you understand the various laws and road signs within the state. This may vary slightly from the state that you are from. It would be advantageous to go into the DMV to get a copy of the Driver�۪s Handbook or to download the PDF from the Department of Motor Vehicle website for the state.

How to Prepare for the Knowledge Test

If you have to take the knowledge test more than once, it could cost you additional fees. It will also delay your ability to get a driver�۪s license within the state. You will want to take a practice test for road signs for the state that you live in. There are usually 25 multiple choice questions on the test from the DMV. You will not be able to bring in any study guides to help you with the test. These 25 questions come from a database of around 200. By taking a few practice tests, you can become familiar with all potential topics and pass the test the first time around.

Infant and Child Car Seat Laws By State

If you are a parent, it's important to understand your state laws regarding infant and child car seats. Unfortunately, many children are injured and die each year because they are not properly secured during a vehicle accident. States all around the country are enacting new laws to help keep children safe. Here are just a few ways you can find out those laws and how to apply them.
If you are a parent, it's important to understand your state laws regarding infant and child car seats. Unfortunately, many children are injured and die each year because they are not properly secured during a vehicle accident. States all around the country are enacting new laws to help keep children safe. Here are just a few ways you can find out those laws and how to apply them.

If you are a parent, it's important to understand your state laws regarding infant and child car seats. Unfortunately, many children are injured and die each year because they are not properly secured during a vehicle accident. States all around the country are enacting new laws to help keep children safe. Here are just a few ways you can find out those laws and how to apply them.

Ask your local Police Department

Local police departments are required to stay abreast of new laws regarding infant and child seating. Since they are often the ones who write tickets and respond first to a car accident, they have to ensure they know the proper laws to ensure that children within their jurisdiction are being kept safe. Many police departments also offer training classes, pamphlets and other materials about understanding child and infant car seats and how to safely install them.

Search Online

There are dozens of places that you can go to find information regarding child seats and new laws that have been enacted. Here at FreeDMVpracticeTests.com for instance, there are several blogs such as this one, which is applicable for California residents, about new laws regarding child safety seat regulations.

Ask Your Local Pediatrician or OB-GYN

Just like police officers, pediatricians often have to treat children who have been injured in a car accident. Many of them make it a practice to keep pamphlets and other reading material readily available for parents who are seeking advice about safety seats. Your pediatrician will often be able to recommend to you a good type of car seat in relation to your child's height and weight. Even if they don't know, they are likely to be able to tell you where you could find such information. The same holds true for prospective mothers who are buying a car seat for the first time. Your OB-GYN will be able to point you in the right direction as far as books to read and things to buy to ensure that your bundle of joy will ride home in comfort and safety.

Tips For Licensed Drives On Passing The Driver's Test In Their New State

Getting a new license in your new state
When you move from one state to the next, you'll need to get a new license in your new home. Most states require a written exam to test you on your knowledge, so you will want to be prepared to pass the test the first time.

When you move from one state to the next, you'll need to get a new license in your new home. Most states require a written exam to test you on your knowledge, so you will want to be prepared to pass the test the first time.

Know What to Study

When you move from state to state, you have to prove that you are knowledgeable about the laws within that particular state. To pass the written exam, you will need to know: - State-specific driving laws - Road signs - Emergency conditions Every state has different traffic laws, and you will need to be familiar with them before you can earn your license. You can visit the DMV website for the state you are moving to and begin reading the official driver's manual. This will allow you to read up on all of the laws that are effective in your state. You can learn about speed limits, how to handle weather conditions and how various other regulations apply when you're on the road.

Practice Makes Perfect

Your goal should always be to pass the written test the first time around. If you have to take the written exam on more than one occasion, it will cost you more money. Taking a DMV practice test can help you study in advance. A practice test is made of multiple-choice questions, and each time you take the test, there will be different randomly chosen questions. At the end of the test, you will receive a score to let you know whether you passed or not. A practice test can give you the confidence you need to go in and take the real exam at the DMV. The scoring system of the written test to obtain a license varies from state to state. In many instances, it is important score at least 70 percent so that you can pass and get your driver's license. DMV cheat sheets can help you with what you need to know to pass for each state exam. Be sure you bring everything you need to the DMV office when you go!

Common Traffic Safety Laws That May Vary By State

Check speed limits that may differ from state to state
If you are moving from one state to another, or even passing through a state on a road trip, it is possible that driving laws will vary. If you are not aware of these laws, you may be at risk for a ticket or arrest if you commit a violation. Here are some common traffic safety laws that may vary by state.

If you are moving from one state to another, or even passing through a state on a road trip, it is possible that driving laws will vary. If you are not aware of these laws, you may be at risk for a ticket or arrest if you commit a violation. Here are some common traffic safety laws that may vary by state.

Speed Limits

Speed limits differ from state to state and even road to road. You must pay attention to the speed limit signs on the side of the road to avoid getting a ticket.

Drunk Driving

The laws for receiving a DUI vary across the nation. Although the legal limit is a .08 percent blood-alcohol content in most states, some have a lesser offense for having a BAC of .04 percent, which an individual might achieve with just one drink. You must be cautious of these laws to avoid getting a serious charge.

Right on Red

In many places in the United States, making a right turn at a red light is completely legal. In others, however, a right turn at a red light is illegal and can result in a fine for the driver as well as a charge for endangering other drivers on the road. You should be aware of the laws of the state you are in to keep yourself from getting this charge.

Child Passenger Safety

If you are driving with a child, you always want that child to be safe. That might mean that you want to buckle your child in an adult seat belt, but this might be illegal in some states that have differing laws on the safety of a child passenger. Some states require booster seats or child seats for different ages, weights and heights. These laws must be checked before getting on the road with a child to avoid a fine. An excellent way to brush up on state laws and regulations is to use a DMV Practice test. You can use these tests to ensure your knowledge of driving laws is enough to keep you safe on the road in any state.��

How Would the Driverless Car Affect Driving Laws?

Driverless Car
In life-threatening scenarios where his mind is not 100% concentrated on his driving, who would then do the driving for him? This is probably the time to be thankful with today�۪s technology as there are now cars that can be effectively operated with minimal input required from the driver, and that is through an automated car, or popularly known as the driverless car.

In life-threatening scenarios where his mind is not 100% concentrated on his driving, who would then do the driving for him? This is probably the time to be thankful with today�۪s technology as there are now cars that can be effectively operated with minimal input required from the driver, and that is through an automated car, or popularly known as the driverless car.

But with this remarkable automotive innovation, would this mean that a new law should be passed to legalize the use of a somewhat risky driverless car? Or should amendments on driving laws be made to adjust to automated car�۪s efficient features? Here are some possible influences that driverless cars can bring in today�۪s driving laws.

Issues on Commercialization

Issues on driving laws are sure to arise the very moment that driverless cars are put into commercial use. Some of the attorneys of California Department of Motor Vehicles raised the concern that most technologies incorporated on these automated cars are far beyond the laws instilled in most states, as most laws governing traffic cases are assumed to be under human operation.

This raised issue definitely makes a lot of sense, as this can pose some confusion in laying out what laws to be used in moments of traffic cases involving automated cars. According to New York Times, ���Technically, cars that drive themselves are not illegal, because there is no law that says cars must have driver.�۝ (http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/25/with-a-push-from-google-california-legalizes-driverless-cars/)

Legalization of Automated Cars

As the prime developer of driverless cars, Google is in hot pursuit to take necessary steps that would eventually legalize the use of these self-driving cars. According to another report of New York Times, ���Google says that it does not want to make cars, but instead work with suppliers and automakers to bring its technology to the market place. The company sees the project as an outgrowth of its core work in software and data management, and talks about re-imagining people�۪s relationship with their automobiles.�۝ (http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/28/automobiles/yes-driverless-cars-know-the-way-to-san-jose.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0).

With that said, it is indeed clear that Google has a fairly good point of wanting to commercialize the automated cars as it will not only advocate safe driving but will eventually encourage people to be more aware of the things involved in their automobiles. Obviously, Google�۪s work has been paying off as there are some states today that have permitted the use of automated cars for road test, particularly Nevada, Florida and California. As a matter of fact, Governor Jerry Brown's signing of legislation to legalize driverless cars in the state of California made a divided reaction among his constituents.��

Ryan Calo, a professor at the University of Washington, sees this event as something beneficial, as California and the two other states�۪ action can trigger law enforcement to make certain amendments on the current driving laws in order to put things into a much controlled scenario, in case other political bodies would legalize driverless cars in their states.

Calo, like Google, manufacturers, and research institutions, believes that legalization of driverless cars would settle down all the uncertainties surrounding this Google-innovated car and would eventually stop the entire unnecessary buzz around it. He stated on one of his interviews in the New York Times that, ���Because it is going to look strange to a sheriff driving by, and to remove uncertainty, what they want is a pronouncement that, yes, it is OK to be driving cars around here without a driver.�۝ (http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/25/with-a-push-from-google-california-legalizes-driverless-cars/)

Long Term Legal Vision

When looking through the capabilities of driverless cars on a wider perspective, one can really say that it might actually address issues on reckless driving and might even help minimize the increasing numbers of vehicular accidents.

But, technology does not always promise a perfect operation. In cases of a wreck, who is held responsible? Bryant Walker Smith, Stanford�۪s automotive legal adviser, has an answer to this in his interview with NBC News. According to him, two legal ways can be done to address accidents involving automated cars. Either the driver will be held legally responsible just like for a normal car accident, or the responsibility is passed to the manufacturers. (http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/futureoftech/road-rage-driverless-cars-its-possible-84911)

Unfortunately, those two legal possibilities are not yet written, and until such time, driverless cars will remain to be free to hit the roads despite its poor driving law coverage.

Comprehensive New California Driving Law Roundup.

17 new driving laws took effect at the beginning of the year.
With the start of the New Year, plenty of new laws take effect all across the country, including driving laws. Of course, California is no different, as 17 new driving laws took effect at the beginning of the year. Here is a list of those new California driving laws.

With the start of the New Year, plenty of new laws take effect all across the country, including driving laws. Of course, California is no different, as 17 new driving laws took effect at the beginning of the year. Here is a list of those new laws.

Night Driving Laws in Pennsylvania

Teen Drivers need to know night time driving rules
Night driving is a crucial part of learning how to drive, but young drivers can't just practice anytime between dusk and dawn. Most states have rules regarding when young drivers can drive by themselves at night, when they need to have someone else in the car, and who that someone else needs to be. Even after you get your license, some rules may still apply. Here are the nighttime laws in Pennsylvania that you need to know:

Night driving is a crucial part of learning how to drive, but young drivers can't just practice anytime between dusk and dawn. Most states have rules regarding when young drivers can drive by themselves at night, when they need to have someone else in the car, and who that someone else needs to be. Even after you get your license, some rules may still apply. Here are the nighttime laws in Pennsylvania that you need to know:

 

  • If you just have a learner's permit, then nighttime driving restriction begins at 11 p.m. A young driver may not be behind the wheel between the hours of 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. Young drivers may travel for employment and for volunteer or charitable service during these hours, but they must carry proper documentation.
     
  • Those on the learner's permit need to acquire 65 hours of behind-the-wheel training from a licensed driver over the age of 21 before getting a junior license. At least 10 of those hours much take place at night.
     
  • If you have a junior license, then nighttime driving restriction begins at 11 p.m. Even with a junior license, a young driver may not drive between the hours of 11 p.m. and 5 a.m., unless they carry the proper documentation or they are supervised by a licensed driver over 18.
     
  • Even with proper documentation, those with a permit or a junior license are restricted in the number of passengers they can have in the vehicle. Young drivers can have only one non-family member under 18 with them in the car.
     
  • After six months on the junior license, the restriction rises to no more than three passengers under 18, but only if the young driver has a clean driving record. Immediate family members are excluded from the restriction. The restriction also does not apply if a parent or legal guardian is in the vehicle with the young driver.
     
  • Once on the unrestricted license, the nighttime driving restriction is lifted.
     

 

Some of these restrictions were only implemented this year, so it's important to revise your knowledge of Pennsylvania driving law so you can keep your teens safe, and so they are aware of the law when they are learning how to drive. Car accidents are the number one killer of teenagers in the country, and these laws are only in place to keep young drivers out of dangerous situations.

Distracted Driving Laws in Texas

According to the Texas State Transportation Institute, over two-thirds of teenage drivers admitted to using a cell phone while driving. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that distracted driving accounts for nearly 20 percent of all traffic fatalities in the nation. The State of Texas enacted two new laws that address distracted driving prohibiting the following:

According to the Texas State Transportation Institute, over two-thirds of teenage drivers admitted to using a cell phone while driving. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that distracted driving accounts for nearly 20 percent of all traffic fatalities in the nation. The State of Texas enacted two new laws that address distracted driving prohibiting the following:
 
It is illegal for drivers under the age of 18 to use any type of wireless communication device while operating a motor vehicle.
 
Drivers who hold a learners permit are prohibited from using a hand-held cell phone during the first six months.
 
All drivers are prohibited from using a hand-held drive while operating a motor vehicle in a school-crossing zone.
 
School bus drivers cannot use a cell phone while driving when a passenger 17 or younger is present.
 
This is a primary offense that means law enforcement officers do not need anther reason to pull the driver over and issue a citation.
 
Statewide Text Message Ban Coming Soon
House Bill 242 is currently awaiting approval from Texas Governor Rick Perry. This legislation has already been approved by both the House and Senate as of May 29, 2011. The measure seeks to ban reading or sending any type of text message while operating a motor vehicle. If approved, the law would take effect on September 1, 2011 and offenders would be fined $200 and face up to 30 days in jail. Drivers who cause an accident while emailing or texting resulting in serious injury or death would be charged with a Class B misdemeanor offense. The penalty includes a $2,000 fine and up to 180 days in jail. Exceptions to the proposed law include using a device in an emergency or drivers whose primary job involves communicating with a dispatcher.
 
New Laws in Several Cities
Several cities throughout Texas have enacted new laws regarding cell phone usage and texting while driving. These include the following places:
 
Alvin As of March 2011, texting while driving or using a cell phone in a school zone is illegal.
 
Amarillo Using a cell phone in a school zone while driving is prohibited. The new law goes into effect beginning in the 2011/2012 school year.
 
El Paso The City Council approved a ban on texting or talking on a cell phone while driving on March 9, 2010. Fines can range anywhere from $114 to $500 for each violation.
 
Galveston A fine of up to $500 will be issued to anyone caught texting while driving within city limits.
 
McAllen Driving while text messaging or conducting any Internet related activity was banned on January 24, 2011. Violators will be fined up to $200.
 
Missouri City A ban on texting while driving became effective on June 1, 2010 and offenders will be fined up to $500.
 
San Antonio Texting while driving was banned on January 14, 2011 and violators will be fined up to $200.
 
Stephenville Text messaging and using a hand-held cell phone while driving will result in a fine of up to $200.
When to Consult an Attorney in Texas
When cities and states throughout the nation are facing budget shortfalls, officers are more likely to issue citations. In an effort to gain revenue, the police have begun cracking down and handing out more tickets than ever before. If you have recently been cited for a driving offense in Texas, contact an attorney for help.

New Driving Laws in Illinois

Speeding in Illinois Can Be Costly As of January 1, 2010, the State of Illinois enacted new legislation targeting people who are guilty excessive speeding. Law enforcement officers will no longer just be issuing a citation to drivers. Anyone who operates a motor vehicle over a certain limit will be facing the following criminal charges:

Speeding in Illinois Can Be Costly

As of January 1, 2010, the State of Illinois enacted new legislation targeting people who are guilty excessive speeding. Law enforcement officers will no longer just be issuing a citation to drivers. Anyone who operates a motor vehicle over a certain limit will be facing the following criminal charges: Class B Misdemeanor Offense Any driver found speeding in excess of 30 miles per hour over the speed limit faces a penalty of up to six months in county jail and a fine of $1,500. Class A Misdemeanor Offense Any driver found speeding in excess of 40 miles per hour over the speed limit faces a penalty of up to one year in county jail and a fine of $2,500. These are serious criminal charges and will require the expertise of an attorney who practices law specializing in motor vehicle offenses.

Highland Park Bans Handheld Cell Phones

The City of Highland Park has passed a new law that goes into effect on June 1, 2011. The City Council voted to prohibit all drivers from using a handheld cell phone while operating a motor vehicle. Offenders will be issued a citation and required to pay a fine of up to $75. This is a primary offense, which means that police officers don't need an additional reason to pull you over. If they see you using a handheld phone, they will be stopping you for an infraction.

Cell Phones & Text Messaging

Effective January 1, 2011, all drivers are prohibited from operating a motor vehicle on any roadway while using an electronic communication device unless the device is used in a hands-free or voice-activated mode. This new legislation defines an electronic communication as any type of personal digital assistant, mobile computer or wireless phone, not just handheld cell phones.

When to Get Legal Help From an Illinois Attorney

The current laws in Illinois make it illegal for all drivers under the age of 19 to operate a motor vehicle while using any type of wireless phone, with or without hands-free accessories. Text messaging, emailing and using the Internet while driving is unlawful for drivers of any age. If you have been issued a citation or are facing criminal traffic charges, contact an experienced Illinois attorney for legal advice immediately.

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