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Suspended License

What to do if you have a suspended license and are moving out of state

Taking Care of a Suspended License When Moving Out of State When you move to a new state, it is mandatory that you surrender your old license before applying for a license in that new state. However, what should you do if your license is suspended? What steps should you take to ensure that you can get a license in your new home state?
Taking Care of a Suspended License When Moving Out of State When you move to a new state, it is mandatory that you surrender your old license before applying for a license in that new state. However, what should you do if your license is suspended? What steps should you take to ensure that you can get a license in your new home state?

Taking Care of a Suspended License When Moving Out of State When you move to a new state, it is mandatory that you surrender your old license before applying for a license in that new state. However, what should you do if your license is suspended? What steps should you take to ensure that you can get a license in your new home state?

Talk to the DMV in the State Where the License is Suspended

The first thing that you need to do is talk to the DMV in the state where your license is suspended. Many states have laws that require you to stop driving and/or turn in your plates when your license is suspended. Even if you are allowed to drive to work or school, you still may not be able to drive to another state.

Follow State Guidelines for Reinstatement

Typically, you must follow the guidelines of the state where your license was suspended before you can apply for a license in a new state. Getting your license reinstated could be as simple as paying an outstanding parking ticket or showing proof of insurance following a traffic stop or an accident.

You Won't Be Allowed to Register Your Car

Drivers won't be allowed to register their car or get insurance in their new state if they have a suspended license in another state. It is important to understand that drivers must be insured by a provider located in their new state of residence. This means that drivers who drive on a suspended license could face charges of driving without insurance if they are caught driving illegally. There is a lot at stake if you drive with a suspended license. Even if you move to another state, you won't be able to get your license back until you resolve the issue in your former state. Therefore, make sure that you take care of your license as part of any pre-move planning on your part.

New Florida Driving Laws Offer Redemption For Motorists

The State of Florida considers driving a privilege that motorists must earn. A person driving privileges can be suspended for a variety of reasons, such as failing to pay traffic citations. Florida uses a system to assess points against an individuals drivers license when they commit certain types of infractions.

Florida's Driver's License Point System

If you exceed the maximum amount of points within a certain timeframe, your license can be suspended. The laws in Florida allow the Department of Vehicles to suspend a driver's license if he or she has the following points assessed: 12 points within a 12-month period will result in a 30-day suspension 18 points within an 18-month period will result in a 90-day suspension 24 points within a 36-month period will result in a 12-month suspension Any driver younger than 18 will have their license privileges limited if they accrue six points within a 12-month period.

New 2010 Florida Law Gives Violators Options

Florida motorists may be surprised to learn how high the fines are for various types of moving violations. Drivers who fail to pay a toll will be slapped with a fine of $190 whereas individuals caught speeding in a school or construction zone may face a fine of $1,000. Repeat offenders who are unable to pay these penalties could wind up with a suspended license. A new law that recently went into effect will help drivers pay off their fines over a period of time. On October 1, 2010, Governor Charlie Crist signed new legislation to help motorists deal with paying off their traffic fines. Anyone charged with non-criminal traffic violations will be able to set up installment payments rather than paying the fine in one lump sum. Drivers who have had their license suspended due to non-criminal traffic citations will be given the opportunity to get their license back once the fines are paid in full. However, if the person misses just one payment, they will be required to pay the amount in full. They could possibly lose their driving privileges altogether if the judge decides to throw the book at them.

How a Florida Lawyer Can Help Your Case

When you have been issued a ticket for speeding or any other type of moving violation, there are options you can pursue. An attorney who specializes in fighting tickets may be able to get the fine reduced. Offenders may be eligible to attend traffic school and have the infraction dismissed altogether. Contact a lawyer to find out how they can help your case in order to avoid huge fines and points on your license.

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